neurosciencestuff

neurosciencestuff:

A type of immune cell widely believed to exacerbate chronic adult brain diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), can actually protect the brain from traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, according to Cleveland Clinic…

explore-blog
Creative ideas probably occur as part of a potentially dangerous mental process, when associations in the brain are flying freely during unconscious mental states — how thoughts must become momentarily disorganized prior to organizing. Such a process is very similar to that which occurs during psychotic states of mania, depression, or schizophrenia. In fact, the great Swiss psychiatrist Eugen Bleuler, who gave schizophrenia its name, described a “loosening of associations” as its most characteristic feature: “Of the thousands of associative threads that guide our thinking, this disease seems to interrupt, quite haphazardly, sometimes single threads, sometimes a whole group, and sometimes whole segments of them.”
sephora
sephora:

Our mothers taught us it’s what’s on the inside that counts. However, it’s a little different when it comes to beauty products. In the ever-crowded beauty universe, a great product has to have more than just an exceptional formula. It must also have a smart, attractive look and be consistently easy to use. Below, we detailed the three rules for perfect product encasement. KATE HELFRICH, PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR OF SEPHORA COLLECTION
THE RULES
#1: Packaging must communicate with more than just words. The best product packaging contains subtle cues to entice the customer and convey its message. For example, if it’s a shiny lip gloss, there should be reflective or metallic elements on the packaging. Or, if the product is all about color, there should be a clear window to display the saturated pigments—rather than opaque packaging covering it up. Basically, when you hold the product in your hand, you shouldn’t have to think twice about what it actually does.
#2: Packaging must support the formula. The product’s encasement must be tuned into the item’s technical needs. If the formula is light-sensitive (as in, then the color will fade with exposure to light), the package might have to be coated with a special UV film. On the other hand, if the product has a high water content, then the package may have to be air-tight—to keep the formula from drying out and looking like a plot of cracked earth. 
#3: Packaging must be accurate and durable. Crazy but true: There’s a formula evacuation test for beauty products that come in tubes or pumps. If the product has never been opened before, and the user has to pump it more than 20 times to get out the first drop of product—you’re in trouble, and you’d better find a new pump, stat. The product has to dispense easily and accurately for it to be considered ready for sale. Additionally, there’s a drop to make sure that when a product hits the floor from a certain distance, the hinge doesn’t pop or the cap doesn’t break. These tests certainly don’t involve skyscraper distances, but are enough to do some damage and show the potential of destruction.  After a failed drop test, the developer may decide to reinforce the packaging or put it in a carton for extra safety.
TOP EXAMPLES
SEPHORA COLLECTION Luster Matte Lipcolor I just love how the saturated color pops out of the vial, and the soft matte cap communicating the matte finish is a perfect touch.
Dior Addict It-Lash Mascara Look at the logo carved into the side, so obvious yet understated. And the slick matte jet-black packaging matches the jet-black formula inside. I also love the chubby handle, which makes using the wand super easy.
SEPHORA COLLECTION Perfection Mist Airbrush Foundation                                                                          Aerosol spray-based products are tough to develop; they can be messy and malfunction easily. This mist foundation sprays like a dream every time, and the look is just flawless. I love the outside every bit as much as the inside.
Too Faced The Chocolate Bar Eye Palette The packaging is shaped like squares of a chocolate bar—which is the theme of the whole palette, with rich smoky and neutral hues. The shadows even smell like cocoa!
SHOP SEPHORA>

TOO FACED / The Chocolate Bar Eye Palette$49.00

SEPHORA COLLECTION / Perfection Mist Airbrush Foundation$28.00

DIOR / Dior Addict It-Lash Mascara$26.00

SEPHORA COLLECTION / Luster Matte Long-Wear Lip Color$16.00

sephora:

Our mothers taught us it’s what’s on the inside that counts. However, it’s a little different when it comes to beauty products. In the ever-crowded beauty universe, a great product has to have more than just an exceptional formula. It must also have a smart, attractive look and be consistently easy to use. Below, we detailed the three rules for perfect product encasement. KATE HELFRICH, PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR OF SEPHORA COLLECTION

THE RULES

#1: Packaging must communicate with more than just words.
The best product packaging contains subtle cues to entice the customer and convey its message. For example, if it’s a shiny lip gloss, there should be reflective or metallic elements on the packaging. Or, if the product is all about color, there should be a clear window to display the saturated pigments—rather than opaque packaging covering it up. Basically, when you hold the product in your hand, you shouldn’t have to think twice about what it actually does.

#2: Packaging must support the formula.
The product’s encasement must be tuned into the item’s technical needs. If the formula is light-sensitive (as in, then the color will fade with exposure to light), the package might have to be coated with a special UV film. On the other hand, if the product has a high water content, then the package may have to be air-tight—to keep the formula from drying out and looking like a plot of cracked earth. 

#3: Packaging must be accurate and durable.
Crazy but true: There’s a formula evacuation test for beauty products that come in tubes or pumps. If the product has never been opened before, and the user has to pump it more than 20 times to get out the first drop of product—you’re in trouble, and you’d better find a new pump, stat. The product has to dispense easily and accurately for it to be considered ready for sale. Additionally, there’s a drop to make sure that when a product hits the floor from a certain distance, the hinge doesn’t pop or the cap doesn’t break. These tests certainly don’t involve skyscraper distances, but are enough to do some damage and show the potential of destruction.  After a failed drop test, the developer may decide to reinforce the packaging or put it in a carton for extra safety.

TOP EXAMPLES

SEPHORA COLLECTION Luster Matte Lipcolor
I just love how the saturated color pops out of the vial, and the soft matte cap communicating the matte finish is a perfect touch.

Dior Addict It-Lash Mascara
Look at the logo carved into the side, so obvious yet understated. And the slick matte jet-black packaging matches the jet-black formula inside. I also love the chubby handle, which makes using the wand super easy.

SEPHORA COLLECTION Perfection Mist Airbrush Foundation                                                                          Aerosol spray-based products are tough to develop; they can be messy and malfunction easily. This mist foundation sprays like a dream every time, and the look is just flawless. I love the outside every bit as much as the inside.

Too Faced The Chocolate Bar Eye Palette
The packaging is shaped like squares of a chocolate bar—which is the theme of the whole palette, with rich smoky and neutral hues. The shadows even smell like cocoa!

SHOP SEPHORA>

image

TOO FACED / The Chocolate Bar Eye Palette
$49.00

image

SEPHORA COLLECTION / Perfection Mist Airbrush Foundation
$28.00

image

DIOR / Dior Addict It-Lash Mascara
$26.00

image

SEPHORA COLLECTION / Luster Matte Long-Wear Lip Color
$16.00

strandbooks
strandbooks:

Tip: Read Renata Adler. Speedboat, too!
From our friendsnyrbclassics:


Bartók was what he played, Bartók and Telemann. But what moved him was Wasting Away Again in Margaritaville. What lifted his spirits one season was I’ve Got a Pair of Brand New Roller Skates, You’ve Got a Brand New Key.
—Renata Adler, Pitch Dark

Purchased at Strand Bookstore in New York City.
As always: If you have a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

strandbooks:

Tip: Read Renata Adler. Speedboat, too!

From our friends
nyrbclassics
:

Bartók was what he played, Bartók and Telemann. But what moved him was Wasting Away Again in Margaritaville. What lifted his spirits one season was I’ve Got a Pair of Brand New Roller Skates, You’ve Got a Brand New Key.

—Renata Adler, Pitch Dark

Purchased at Strand Bookstore in New York City.

As always: If you have a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea, send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

neurosciencestuff
neurosciencestuff:

New research: teaching the brain to reduce pain
People can be conditioned to feel less pain when they hear a neutral sound, new research from the University of Luxembourg has found. This lends weight to the idea that we can learn to use mind-over-matter to beat pain. The scientific article was published recently in the online journal “PLOS One”.
Scientists have known for many years that on-going pain in one part of the body is reduced when a new pain is inflicted to another part of the body. This pain blocking is a physiological reaction by the nervous system to help the body deal with a potentially more relevant novel threat.
To explore this “pain inhibits pain” phenomenon, painful electric pulses were first administered to a subject’s foot (first pain) and the resulting pain intensity was then measured. Then the subject was asked to put their hand in a bucket of ice water (novel stimulus causing pain reduction), and as they did so, a telephone ringtone sounded in headphones. After this procedure had been repeated several times, it was observed that the pain felt from the electrical stimulation was reduced simply when the ring tone sounded.
The brain had been conditioned to the ringtone being a signal to trigger the body’s physical pain blocking mechanism. The people being tested not only felt significantly less pain, but there were also fewer objective signs of pain, such as activity in the muscles used in the facial expression of pain (frowning). In total, 32 people were tested.
“We have shown that just as the physiological reaction of saliva secretion was provoked in Pavlov’s dogs by the ringing of a bell, an analogous effect occurs regarding the ability to mask pain in humans,” said Fernand Anton, Professor of Biological Psychology at the University of Luxembourg. “Conversely, similar learning effects may be involved in the enhancement and maintenance of pain in some patients,” added Raymonde Scheuren, lead researcher in this study.

neurosciencestuff:

New research: teaching the brain to reduce pain

People can be conditioned to feel less pain when they hear a neutral sound, new research from the University of Luxembourg has found. This lends weight to the idea that we can learn to use mind-over-matter to beat pain. The scientific article was published recently in the online journal “PLOS One”.

Scientists have known for many years that on-going pain in one part of the body is reduced when a new pain is inflicted to another part of the body. This pain blocking is a physiological reaction by the nervous system to help the body deal with a potentially more relevant novel threat.

To explore this “pain inhibits pain” phenomenon, painful electric pulses were first administered to a subject’s foot (first pain) and the resulting pain intensity was then measured. Then the subject was asked to put their hand in a bucket of ice water (novel stimulus causing pain reduction), and as they did so, a telephone ringtone sounded in headphones. After this procedure had been repeated several times, it was observed that the pain felt from the electrical stimulation was reduced simply when the ring tone sounded.

The brain had been conditioned to the ringtone being a signal to trigger the body’s physical pain blocking mechanism. The people being tested not only felt significantly less pain, but there were also fewer objective signs of pain, such as activity in the muscles used in the facial expression of pain (frowning). In total, 32 people were tested.

“We have shown that just as the physiological reaction of saliva secretion was provoked in Pavlov’s dogs by the ringing of a bell, an analogous effect occurs regarding the ability to mask pain in humans,” said Fernand Anton, Professor of Biological Psychology at the University of Luxembourg. “Conversely, similar learning effects may be involved in the enhancement and maintenance of pain in some patients,” added Raymonde Scheuren, lead researcher in this study.

doctorwho
doctorwho:

Being able to travel thorough all of time and space, The Doctor’s interacted with many real-life historical figures. From meeting Richard Nixon to fighting a Vespiform with Agatha Christie, he’s made a lot of important and famous friends.
But how has The Doctor affected their lives? How have these interactions shaped history without anyone even realizing it? Soon, we can get a peek at just one example with Doctor Who: The Shakespeare Notebooks. 

Newly discovered entries and drawings in William Shakespeare’s journals reveal for the first time the astounding relationship between the great Bard and the Doctor.
Since his first adventure in 1963, the Doctor has enjoyed many encounters with William Shakespeare. Now, BBC Books has rediscovered notebooks, long thought lost, compiled by the Bard in which he divulges the influential role the Doctor played in his creative life. Here are the original notes for Hamlet, including a very different appearance by the ghost; early versions of great lines (“To reverse or not to reverse the polarity of the neutron flow”); the true story of how the faeries of A Midsummer Night’s Dream were first imagined; stage directions for plays adjusted to remove references to a mysterious blue box; and much, much more.

Lucky for us, our friends at Harper Collins were nice enough to give us 10 copies to give away to 10 lucky Whovians.
In honor of Shakespeare’s impressive portfolio (approximately 4 poems, 38 plays, and 154 sonnets that we know of,) you can have a chance at winning a copy of Doctor Who: The Shakespeare Notebooks by posting your own Doctor Who-related poem/haiku/limerick/etc.
And it’s okay if you’re not the best at writing poems, because it can be as simple as:

Roses are red, the TARDIS is blue.This example is bad, how about a haiku? 

Sorry
Post yours in whatever format you’d like (text, recited in a video or audio post, drawn into a piece of fanart, etc.) using the hashtag #DW Poetry and we’ll randomly select 10 entries to win next week. We’ll be reblogging our favorites throughout the weekend, and the deadline is Monday, July 14th at 10AM EST. Good luck! 
(PS, you can always get your own copy right here if you’d like) 

doctorwho:

Being able to travel thorough all of time and space, The Doctor’s interacted with many real-life historical figures. From meeting Richard Nixon to fighting a Vespiform with Agatha Christie, he’s made a lot of important and famous friends.

But how has The Doctor affected their lives? How have these interactions shaped history without anyone even realizing it? Soon, we can get a peek at just one example with Doctor Who: The Shakespeare Notebooks

Newly discovered entries and drawings in William Shakespeare’s journals reveal for the first time the astounding relationship between the great Bard and the Doctor.

Since his first adventure in 1963, the Doctor has enjoyed many encounters with William Shakespeare. Now, BBC Books has rediscovered notebooks, long thought lost, compiled by the Bard in which he divulges the influential role the Doctor played in his creative life. Here are the original notes for Hamlet, including a very different appearance by the ghost; early versions of great lines (“To reverse or not to reverse the polarity of the neutron flow”); the true story of how the faeries of A Midsummer Night’s Dream were first imagined; stage directions for plays adjusted to remove references to a mysterious blue box; and much, much more.

Lucky for us, our friends at Harper Collins were nice enough to give us 10 copies to give away to 10 lucky Whovians.

In honor of Shakespeare’s impressive portfolio (approximately 4 poems, 38 plays, and 154 sonnets that we know of,) you can have a chance at winning a copy of Doctor Who: The Shakespeare Notebooks by posting your own Doctor Who-related poem/haiku/limerick/etc.

And it’s okay if you’re not the best at writing poems, because it can be as simple as:

Roses are red, the TARDIS is blue.
This example is bad, how about a haiku? 

Sorry

Post yours in whatever format you’d like (text, recited in a video or audio post, drawn into a piece of fanart, etc.) using the hashtag #DW Poetry and we’ll randomly select 10 entries to win next week. We’ll be reblogging our favorites throughout the weekend, and the deadline is Monday, July 14th at 10AM EST. Good luck! 

(PS, you can always get your own copy right here if you’d like

michiganengineering
michiganengineering:

Terry Shyu, MSE PhD Student, demonstrates use of nanopillars that reveal hidden images via condensation of fluid on the structures in the NCRB on June 20, 2014.

Shyu is party of Nick Kotov’s research group that is using this form of nanostructure for the purpose of authenticating documents, currency, and so forth.

Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing

www.engin.umich.edu

michiganengineering:

Terry Shyu, MSE PhD Student, demonstrates use of nanopillars that reveal hidden images via condensation of fluid on the structures in the NCRB on June 20, 2014.

Shyu is party of Nick Kotov’s research group that is using this form of nanostructure for the purpose of authenticating documents, currency, and so forth.

Photo: Joseph Xu, Michigan Engineering Communications & Marketing

www.engin.umich.edu